All Tests – Triumph Sprint ST or the English art of spinning – It brawls the British …

TEST

Triumph Sprint ST or the English art of spinning

All Tests - Triumph Sprint ST or the English art of spinning - It brawls the British ...

Armed with the famous Triple 1050 cc of the Speed, the Triumph Sprint ST is equipped with a large fairing and two cases as standard, or even optional ABS. The Englishwoman therefore launches a serious appeal to travel, for an hour, a weekend or a month ?

Test.

It brawls the british…

There are hardly any pins that the Triumph – and its pilot especially – is really cramped. In the climbs of pass – it is true, not very numerous in Normandy … – the stop of lock intervenes too early and can destabilize.

Be careful also when taking the brakes on a curve: the Sprint ST has a slight tendency to refuse the obstacle and you have to work hard to keep the desired trajectory..

The brakes are 320mm discs bitten by branded four-piston calipers – oh my god, the Japanese are everywhere – Nissin, and are powerful and enduring enough to effectively stop the car. The rear brake – 250 mm and dual piston – is equally capable.

Equipped with ABS, our test model even demonstrated impressive powers on the greasy little roads of Normandy: no twitching in the fingers and safe and efficient braking. Security contract fulfilled !

On the other hand, the results darken markedly as regards the feeling in "normal" use. Indeed, activated for the first time, the front brake lever does not react in the same way when it comes time to take a second bite to tackle a bend drier than expected … or let a car pass on a roundabout. !

The front brakes attack much earlier and can surprise the pilot, or even the front tire, in the event of – second – braking. Confusing – then unpleasant once you know – this early attack quickly disappears, and the lever returns to its "normal" operation the following turn.

Because of this only irregularity, the braking becomes the weakness of this Sprint ST, even if the sharpest will take care to "prime" the lever before approaching a big braking, while the wiser will perhaps never be hampered by this difference in reaction…

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