Discovery – The World Ducati Week 2014 will take place from July 18 to 20 – Occasions DUCATI

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35 Pictures

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BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, Kawasaki Z 800 and KTM 1290 Super Duke R – it’s actually a shame that the Kawa doesn’t have an R in its name…

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Also looks almost like a Z: The R of the 1290 Super Duke.

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The shapes of the KTM instruments don’t really fit together optically.

The cockpit offers a lot of information.

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Directly hinged shock absorber with a firm basic setting. It works fine with the right setup.

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Lots of buttons, lots of setting options: driver assistants and modes, cockpit information.

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KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

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MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR.

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MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR.

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One white, one red: two Rs for the brutal.

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The dynamically styled instrument unit provides all the necessary information. Extras such as the ambient temperature are missing.

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For the first time there is a steering damper on a Brutale. He suppresses violent beating of the handlebars.

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The shock absorber offers plenty of damping reserves, but does not respond particularly sensitively.

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MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR.

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BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, Kawasaki Z 800 and KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

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BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, Kawasaki Z 800 and KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

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BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, Kawasaki Z 800 and KTM 1290 Super Duke R (from right to left).

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KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

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KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

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Kawasaki Z 800.

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Even if the KTM is discreetly restrained in the picture …

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… she is not only part of the group, but will even prove herself to be the top dog in the test.

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BMW R 1200 R..

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BMW R 1200 R..

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BMW R 1200 R. The second R nice and big and red.

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Nobody knows anymore: The BMW cockpit offers a flood of information. You can also choose between three different types of display. The navigation system in the foreground is an optional accessory.

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Works like a dream: special equipment "Shift Assistant Pro" including clutch-free downshifts.

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With the move into the R 1200 R, the water boxer is now in all boxer models.

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BMW R 1200 R..

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Kawasaki Z 800.

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Kawasaki Z 800.

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While the BMW and MV Aguste each have two Rs in their names, the Kawa prefers to flaunt its Z..

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Typical Kawa shapes shape the cockpit itself: angular, aggressive, conspicuous. The information is a bit poor, a gear indicator is missing.

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The fork is only adjustable in rebound (photo) and spring base. Overall, she works very well.

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Still a great design gag: taillights as normal and mirrored Z..

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BMW R 1200 R, Kawasaki Z 800, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR and KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

BMW R 1200 R, Kawasaki Z 800, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

Four current naked bikes in horsepower comparison

Content of

Two-, three- or four-cylinder? 800, 1200 or 1300 cubic? Germany, Italy, Japan or Austria? Clear the ring for the most exciting crossover break in 2015.

They fight for every inch. Wheel to wheel, the four brawlers speed through the beautiful corners of Provence in the south of France. You anchor in formation flight, bend jaggedly and pull the shower back up early and hard – country road shooting at it’s best! For BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, Kawasaki Z 800 and KTM 1290 Super Duke R is at stake. In addition to the eternal banter "newcomer against the establishment", the engine concepts and manufacturers are also fighting for honor and victory. Who will come out on top in the end? Two-, three- or four-cylinder? 800, 1200 or 1300 cubic? Germany, Italy, Japan or Austria? Clear the ring for the most exciting crossover break in 2015. 

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BMW R 1200 R, Kawasaki Z 800, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, KTM 1290 Super Duke R.
Four current naked bikes in horsepower comparison

R 1200 R close to the rear wheel of the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. A divine image reveals itself to the author on the KTM: in the rearview mirror, a pilot flying low with a dark-sighted helmet and hanging-off on a flat twin! But it’s really annoying that Jo can’t be shaken off. How is that possible? After all, the Austrian presses a plump 168 HP and a monstrous 140 Nm on the dyno roller. The BMW counters with a comparatively manageable 125 PS and 124 Nm.

The KTM is 29 kilos lighter than the BMW

In addition, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R, weighing 213 kilograms, is a whopping 29 kilograms lighter than the BMW R 1200 R, which weighs an enormous 242 kilograms. When it comes to speed, Jo and the scribbler are on the same level. “I have to give it my all,” snorts the pester. "Fortunately, there are only shorts straights here at Col de l’Espigoulier. Otherwise it would look different. ”That’s true. Only from around 80 km / h in second gear does the KTM march much better and can break away from the BMW. But before there is a noticeable gap, the next curve is waiting. It is generally easier for pursuers there because the scout in front of them has to pay more attention to the traffic and the road conditions. In addition, the people behind can orientate themselves on the line of the vehicle in front. That is why the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR sticks to the leading duo, followed by the Kawasaki Z 800 a little behind.

BMW R 1200 R lashes forward vehemently


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Tea BMW R 1200 R snaps cheekily from its exhaust pipe.

Completely inspired by the speed frenzy, the BMW driver is delighted with the most modern flat twin of all time, best known under the term water boxer. With the move into the new BMW R 1200 R, the partly water-cooled drive is now buzzing in all boxer models (except R nineT). Its cream range is between 4500 / min and 7000 / min. There he goes off like hell and vehemently whips the rubber cow forward. Respect! As a special treat, she snaps cheekily from her exhaust. In addition, even in the sportiest “Dynamic” driving mode, the BMW takes on the gas gently and comfortably. However, this mode is part of the “Driving Modes Pro” package, which is subject to a surcharge and which also includes the high-quality and gently regulating DTC traction control. The BMW R 1200 R is equipped with ASC (automatic stability control) and the "Rain" and "Road" modes as standard. Although these work well, they react a little more cautiously to the pilot’s gas commands. 

As usual, this BMW test is almost fully equipped. A hammer part is the "Shift Assistant Pro", which also costs extra. It enables upshifts and downshifts without a clutch (blipper). Originally designed for super athletes and the racetrack, this feature is also ideal for sporty activities on the country road: turn off the gas, push in the next lower gear, done. The electronics do the rest, including double-declutching. This keeps your head free for late braking and ideal turning points. The standard anti-hopping clutch supports the pilot in this exercise, as it almost eliminates the rear wheel jarring typical of cardan BMWs when downshifting early. As a result, the cow is wonderfully stable in front of the corners. A fat package that the BMW R 1200 R knocks out the competition. Does this find the right answer? 

MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR goes hard on the gas


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Angry, hot-blooded and hungry: both the engine and the sound of the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR inspire emotions.

In terms of experience value, the second newcomer in the league, the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, the BMW R 1200 R is definitely pouring a lot. Your strengthened triplet delivers plenty of smoke with 135 hp and presents it in a unique way: angry, hot-blooded, hungry. She hisses from her exhaust like a cobra about to snap shut. Emotionally, MV is undoubtedly in the top league. The downside is the engine mapping. In contrast to the presentation (PS 12/2014), the three-cylinder in the modes "S" (sport) and "N" (normal) accelerates quite hard, which hampers sensitive acceleration and hearty wheelies. Only in rain mode "R" does the power come in gently, but at the expense of liveliness. In addition, the triple grabs abruptly in the partial load range – this is also irritating when the room is cheerful. An individual case of the test machine? Please check, MV!

The same applies to the coordination of the automatic switchgear. The system delivers clearly noticeable gear changes when upshifting and the blipper function threw in the towel after just half a day of testing. In addition, the traction control works unreliably as usual, it is best to switch it off completely. So there is still a lot of homework for the Italians to do. But the captivating drive and the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR as a total work of art are worth it. 

Kawasaki Z 800 implements gas commands directly


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At the bottom and in the middle, the Kawasaki Z 800 delivers a lot of steam.

Hard work was apparently already done by Kawasaki. Because, unlike in previous tests, the four-cylinder of the Kawasaki Z 800 now directly implements throttle commands, a delayed throttle response is not an issue, at least with this specimen – it works. Despite the almost identical displacement as the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, the Kawasaki with 110 hp has significantly less pressure than the Italian and thus bears the red power lamp of the test. The Japanese tuned the quadruplet so that it delivers a lot of steam at the bottom and in the middle – the perfect concept for a naked bike. But around the top he runs out of breath, and the high speeds are of no use either.

The Kawasaki Z 800’s short gear ratio helps to increase dynamics. It at least partially conceals the proud weight of 231 kilos. Only the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR has an even shorter translation, which, together with its feather-light 193 kilos, delivers an amazing start. More about the overall performance and the relationship between power, gear ratio, speeds and weight can be found in the diagrams in PS Issue 3/2015 or in the article PDF (download under the picture gallery).

Back to the Kawasaki Z 800. The distinctive sound is typical for four-cylinder of this brand: deep intake growl, threatening rumble up to medium speeds, hoarse screams at maximum tours. The sound covers fans of four-of-a-kind with goose bumps – guaranteed!

TC of the KTM 1290 Super Duke R cannot be adjusted


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Unfortunately, the traction control of the KTM 1290 Super Duke R has not yet allowed a clean unicycle dance and must be deactivated for such insoles.

The Super Duke driver gets that too. We already mentioned the killer punch of the 1301 cubic V2, plus the breathtaking elasticity of the twin. Regardless of the engine speed, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R will always snap away as if pulled by a gigantic rubber band. 

In addition, the drive accelerates wonderfully smoothly and runs very cultivated. The sonorous, powerful hum of the exhaust also turns on. Undoubtedly one of the hottest country road drives on the planet. Only the traction control often brakes the load too early. Since it doesn’t offer any setup options, the electronics technicians apparently tuned the system very conservatively. Our dearest wish for the KTM 1290 Super Duke R is therefore an adjustable TC and an independent, likewise adjustable wheelie control. So far, traction control has not allowed a clean unicycle dance and must be deactivated for such insoles. Until a new set-up comes, the electronics should no longer reset the driving aids to their basic settings every time the engine is restarted. Ask about Mattighofen: Can that be arranged?? 

BMW R 1200 R with series seat too passive

The KTM 1290 Super Duke R is still setting the pace, with the BMW R 1200 R, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR and Kawasaki Z 800 lurking in tow. We have already learned that the quartet stays close together on a tight track. The situation is similar in more open terrain, in order to prevent the cardboard from moving to the uniformed race control for a long time. But what then makes the difference? What are the advantages of a particular machine if all bikes are at least as fast on the country road? The explanation is simple: Regardless of brand sympathy and other preferences, sporting use is easier on some bikes and is more fun than on others. This also includes the driving experience, which is determined not only by the engine but also by the seating position, handling and, in general, the chassis. In these points, our four candidates differ massively, in some boxes. 

Handling example: The Superquirl MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR circles around the massive BMW R 1200 R. The driver has to plow through the meandering so as not to lose touch – difficult, but not impossible. During the hunt, the cow driver is supported by the high accuracy and cornering stability of the BMW. Even with this exercise, it does not quite come close to the laser-precise and stable MV. But for a boxer, the Bavarian burns off a great fireworks display. She only leaves a few springs when it comes to feedback. The rider is simply sitting far too far away from the front wheel. In contrast to the presentation (PS 1/2015), the test motorcycle has the standard bench seat. With a seat height of 790 millimeters, it is a whopping 50 mm lower than the accessory bench at the presentation. These are worlds when it comes to ergonomics. The feedback is guaranteed to increase with the seat height. How strong remains to be seen. At the next opportunity we will compare the different benches. In series production the position is too passive. 

Kawasaki Z 800 better with other tires?

The Kawasaki Z 800 does not deliver a crisp one-on-one feeling from the front either. But that is not due to the seating position, because it is very front-wheel-oriented in the aggro style. Rather, the somewhat unfortunate choice of series tires shoots across, we have already reported about it several times. Nevertheless, the tire behaves more peacefully than usual. On the one hand, the righting moment when braking in an inclined position is not so clear. In addition, the Kawasaki easy can be directed through the tangled bends and stays more safely on the chosen line. That was different before. It is unclear whether the Kawasaki Z 800 owes this to the "minor changes to the fork setting" (original quote from Kawasaki). But what else? Series distribution of tires? We owe the answer here today. The next time we meet, we’ll try other rubbers.

Comfortable, active, sporty on the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR

This is not necessary with the Super Duke. It’s amazing how stormy and safe the KTM 1290 Super Duke R pounds through the cornering Eldorado. Only the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR fires a bit more mercilessly through the passages and sets the record when sharpening corners. However, this does not apply at the exit of a curve. There she often jumps wildly on the rear wheel, the engine mapping sends its regards. 

Fortunately, the rider always has the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR firmly under control thanks to the first-class seating position. It shares this great feature with the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. The ergonomic triangle of bench, handlebars and notches is almost identical in both. Only the knee angle is a bit more comfortable on the MV because of the lower footrests. Comfortable, active, sporty: it couldn’t be better!

Cushioning and ABS

What is still missing? Right, the spring elements. Here too, the BMW R 1200 R offers an optional feature with "Dynamic ESA". At the push of a button, the “Road” and “Dynamic” modes change the damping setup of the fork and shock absorber. Clever sensors then record the driving condition and adjust the damping accordingly. The rear spring preload can also be adjusted to the load condition from the handlebar fitting. The whole system basically works very well. But regardless of the setting, the rear wheel sometimes tramples out of track when brutally shooting out of the corners due to a lack of damping. The BMW R 1200 R shares this characteristic with the Kawasaki Z 800. Admittedly, we’re talking about a very ambitious driving style! Neither the KTM 1290 Super Duke R nor the MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR can harm this, because their suspension elements have enough reserves. The brutal strut, however, overshoots the target. Even when the pressure level is completely open, it bumps nastily over bumps. This leads to unrest in the chassis with fidgeting handlebars as a result. But the new, finely tuned fork and the steering damper used for the first time keep the Brutale firmly on course and prevent worse. 

This also applies to the ABS of the four ruffians. The system of the BMW R 1200 R works most effectively. It regulates heavenly late and only intervenes shortly before blocking. This creates infinite trust and sets the braking points a few meters further back. Here is a general tip for the sporty pace: only brake at the front! Because the rear wheel locks up very quickly due to the dynamic wheel load distribution. This also affects the regulation of the front wheel. With the result that the system intervenes unnecessarily. The KTM 1290 Super Duke R offers a first-class solution. In Supermoto mode, the rear wheel is decoupled from the ABS. This also enables very wild riders to make big braking drifts. The systems of the Kawasaki Z 800 and MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR regulate a bit early for a sporty passion. The manufacturers play it safe and want to prevent the forward flip. The solution here would be an adjustable ABS that allows the rider to choose between maximum performance and maximum safety.

Conclusion

35 Pictures

Images: BMW R 1200 R, Kawasaki Z 800, MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR, KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

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Data: BMW R 1200 R


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BMW R 1200 R..

Data: Kawasaki Z 800


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Kawasaki Z 800.

Data: KTM 1290 Super Duke R


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KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

Data: MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR


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MV Agusta Brutale 800 RR.

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