Discovery – Zero Motorcycles at the 2013 Paris Motorcycle Show – Occasions ZERO MOTORCYCLES

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BMW R 1200 GS, Honda CBF 1000, Kawasaki Ninja 250 R, KTM 990 Adventure, Suzuki Gladius, Triumph Daytona 675, Yamaha FJR 1300

Wanted: the best street bike of 2009

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Large all-round road transport from PS. Who gets mad at whom, who is the boss in the pickle jar? Armed with seven completely different motorcycles, the PS editors went on the hunt for the best street bike of 2009 in the Black Forest.

Tick, tock, tick, tock. The office clock shows 10 past 3, boredom is widespread in the PS editorial office. The boss and secretary are out on business, the sun is shining outside and somehow there is no motivation to do something. Suddenly there is a creak of boots and leather squeaks through the hallway, mixed with gossip and laughter. A head appears in the office door: "Hey boys! Desire to burn a little through the Black Forest?" Three bikers friends are standing in full gear in the hallway and looking expectantly around. The sun suddenly seems a little brighter outside. "What bikes?", we ask. "Honda CBF 1000, Suzuki Gladius and KTM 990 Adventure. You just have to see what you can get in a hurry." Do we. The day is saved.

A few minutes later, four somewhat lost characters are looking for a mobile undercarriage in the in-house underground car park. Phew, difficult. BMW R 1200 GS? Wide handlebars, a lot of punch from below, could become something. Triumph Daytona 675? Yeah, PS is the Sport-Motorrad Magazin, fits. FJR 1300? After all, won a comparison test two years ago, why not? What else – a 125cc Yamaha? No, not enough power. Kawa Ninja 250? Hm. The head weighs. Certainly has great handling, but the Thai tires don’t exactly inspire confidence, and there’s hardly any performance either. "I’ll take it, can have my gladius", I hear behind me and just out of the corner of my eye I see test driver Sven grabbing the Kawasaki key. Well, then that would also be clarified.

Year hour later we stop at a small parking lot. It’s darker between the trees, the air is cool and smells of moss. Car traffic? Nothing. But there are endless curves.

Kawasaki Ninja 250 R


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Kawasaki Ninja 250 R.

Sven squeals away on the little kawa. "I don’t know what they have, the part is great for the Black Forest: super handy, comfortable seating position, a small motor that you can squeeze out fully anytime and anywhere and that pulls through cleanly. I prefer that kind of thing a thousand times to driving a pork bucket of 300 kilos."

That was also the argument of the Kawasaki press spokesman, who, at the presentation last year, revived the fundamentally old 250cc concept with flowery words as suitable for the city and contemporary. It should be practical and pragmatic. Inexpensive, simple and manageable for everyone. Adjust brake lever? Nobody needs in town. Neither a second brake disc or fixed calipers.

A handlebar, footrests, analog, minimalist instruments, a front axle with the diameter of a little finger and a 33-horsepower motor. This is what the city motorcycle of the future will look like in the green Kawa eyes. They probably didn’t have a PS-country road comparison test in mind. The engine, which only accelerates noticeably from 7000 rpm, is much more fun outside of the city.

The first right turn is towards Sven. Well, actually it wanders more. The horrendous speeds distort the perception of speed somewhat. So leave it at full throttle, twenty-one … twenty-two … so, now: braking point. The two pistons of the single floating caliper cling to the brake disc in horror and decelerate the 170 kilo load, well, useful. The front sags noticeably, and Sven angles away. Oh shit – he almost drives into the ditch, in the inside of the bend! The thing is really handy – even handier than its Gladius.

In front of the head he pulls the tap fully open and kicks in the left. Despite the Thai first tire IRC Road Winner, which does not include trust in the front wheel in the purchase price, the little poisonous frog arrows through the changing curve at impressive speed. The others should stay tuned for the time being.

Suzuki Gladius


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Suzuki Gladius.

I put the first gear on Sven’s Gladius and start bubbling. Also an old concept with a new look. The proven SV 650 engine, which provides propulsion in the peppy, rounded Gladius, has been modified to meet Euro 3 and a somewhat softer character on the crankshaft, camshafts, pistons and some other engine internals and develops its 72 hp without noticeable vibrations, very even and with high fun potential.

In general, the little Suzuki is a joy. The handling turns out to be light-footed and exemplary, the 650 changes direction without any serious effort, holds the line well and harmonizes well with the mounted Dunlop Qualifier. After just a few bends, the great confidence in the motorcycle collides with the low ground clearance. With loud scratching, first the notches, a little later the side stand, drag across the Black Forest asphalt. Funny, the pegs mounted far in front feel a bit too high. Will probably be due to the very deep seat, which is very hard for the driver and passenger.

Suddenly a damp spot appears in the braking zone. Adrenaline rushes to my head. The Gladius has no ABS – the crux of the early test date; Since the beginning of July, the Suzuki has been available from dealers for 300 euros more, also with an anti-lock braking system. Unfortunately, it’s only the end of June, and I’m grateful for the first time that the Gladius’s brakes are very blunt. What puts a strain on your forearms and driving pleasure in dry conditions is sometimes an advantage on a wet track. One can only hope that the rubbers of the ABS variant will be more snappy. At the exit of the curve, the pulse has calmed down. Full throttle. The softly tuned shock absorber starts to work noticeably, and the V2 bravely pushes forward, but lacks the last ounce of panache.

Triumph Daytona 675


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Triumph Daytona 675.

The only sportswoman in the test, Triumph’s super sports weapon Daytona 675, does not know this problem. It is true that at the exit of the bend at low engine speeds it lacks the shirt-sleeved acceleration of a busty R 1200 GS. But if you keep the little triplet in a good mood, he pushes the pilot with heart-warming emphasis to the border between fun and stress.

Just the thing for Uwe, ex-rookie and R6 Cup veteran. He needs exercise under his bum, whether on the slopes or in the pampas. The Triumph suits him, especially since the test model is equipped with an automatic switch from the British accessories shelf (329 euros), which also works without any problems at partial load and low speeds. Accompanied by the beguiling three-cylinder sound, Uwe beats the little British girl through the meandering curves, throws her from one incline to the next, enjoys the great chassis.

The little Englishwoman cuts around the corner with the precision of a razor, provides great feedback from the front tire and stays on course even when you pull the throttle at the exit of a curve. The brake is sporty, with great controllability and a good bite. Country road burning at its best. Uwe grins. Only touring fags need comfort, heated grips or ABS to have fun while riding a motorcycle.

KTM 990 Adventure


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KTM 990 Adventure.

Supermoto drifter Jo sees it differently. He wants space on the motorcycle and likes to take a quick turn into the green. The KTM Adventure suits him. The relaxed knee angle and the comfortable bench bring even the tall stunt professional through the day painlessly and offer enough freedom of movement for various shows. And Jo shows a lot of that. Almost from a standing start, he pulls this mountain from the motorcycle onto the rear wheel, tries to keep an eye on the road between the handlebars and arm and shifts through the transmission. Just before the bend, he gently puts down the front wheel and goes into the iron. Well, the adventure brake has a bit of idle travel – but its effect is okay for country roads. The stuttering squeaking of the rear tire acoustically signals the control intervals of the ABS, which can be switched off, the front dips deep – 210 mm of travel is more suitable for off-road terrain than for narrow Black Forest roads.

Jo angles away. Wow, it’s surprisingly easy to turn the corner, the big thing is probably due to the narrow 90s front tire. However, the Pirelli Scorpion should provide a little more feedback, then the great ground clearance of the Adventure could also be used more relaxed. So Jo feels his way relatively carefully through the apex of the curve and loses time that he wants to catch up again at the end of the curve. The great engine of the KTM makes it easy for him: Equipped with new pistons, a revised cylinder head and a different throttle valve housing, the Austrian V2 pushes a whopping 8 hp more than in the previous year and accelerates gently but very lively. At any speed, the engine is ready to go one better if desired.

Accordingly, Jo pulls the cable with motivation, uses the relatively low grip of the studded rear tire to move the Adventure sideways at the exit of a curve and to get momentum for the next straight. The WP shock absorber – adjusted to Jo’s weight by hydraulics in the spring base – really gets going; The Adventure also uses 210 mm of travel at the rear. The fact that the revised engine no longer jerks when driving at constant speed, but rather vibrates a bit at higher speeds, is pretty much lost in Jo’s dynamic driving style.

Honda CBF 1000


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Honda CBF 1000.

Lukas grimaces. In view of this dynamic KTM, his tried and tested CBF 1000 seems a little bit boring. Sure, she always got him comfortably from A to B and often even to C with her typical Honda-style sitting on top of it. Great wind protection, relaxed knee angle, everything fits – especially at the low price. But somehow stop…

Well, don’t think about it, enjoy the curves. After the first bumps in the road, he noticed another plus point of his Honda. Right, the chassis. Responds very well, but is still tuned tight enough and doesn’t fidget. He turns into the first corner, he doesn’t even notice the inconspicuously good three-piston floating caliper brake. The CBF can be maneuvered lightly around the right and changes to the following left bend just as easily. He had almost forgotten the great handling. Everything is somehow so easy and problem-free, not even the early stops really disturb.

His mood brightens; incited, he tears open the tap at the exit of the curve. Hm, is there something going on, or not? Only when the damp spot in the braking zone comes flying too quickly does he realize that the engine is also doing its job well and, apart from vibrations in the higher speed range, unobtrusively. Even power delivery, full power from bottom to top – it’s really fun when you think about it. But right now his thoughts are elsewhere. The ABS rattles and Lukas circles his Honda around the next bend with astonishing playfulness. Phew, gone well. One should not underestimate the CBF.

Bmw r 1200 GS


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BMW R 1200 GS.

Yeah, just let off steam, the day is still long. Jacko sits on the brand new GS from the PS underground car park and calmly puts on his helmet. Every time he enjoys the extras that the Bavarians treat their press motorcycles to – and that really pushes up the test machine price: heated grips 195 euros, tire pressure control 205 euros, ABS 1080 euros, ESA 680 euros … but you are for every situation armed. Jacko ponders: Do I need heated grips? No, it’s warm enough. His eyes glide over the control center of the left fitting. Let’s see: ABS is definitely not wrong, ASC, no, I switch off, I didn’t like it with the K 1300 R. Suspension adjustment? The view remains on the ESA button, with which the dampers of the BMW steamer can be adjusted fully electronically. "Comfort" is good on bumpy slopes, but fits better here "Sports".

Jacko heaves the fat Bavarian off the main stand and drives off. He takes the first corners comfortably, enjoys the very comfortable seating position, the light, almost wobbly handling and the good lean angle in tight turns. In long arcs he keeps the GS on course with a little pressure on the wide handlebars. In alternating curves it bounces surprisingly strong, should that be sport? The on-board computer confirms and provides information on tire pressure, outside temperature and average consumption at the push of a button. Then you can start.

The GS sprints out of the lower rev range with typical boxers, then suddenly drops noticeably at 4000 rpm and only really fires again at 6000 rpm. A linear power development looks different. But the Bavarian on the brakes is a bank. Regardless of the type of road and what speed: just keep it clean. Thanks to Telelever, the front doesn’t sag, the GS stays strictly on course, but lacks any feedback from the front tire. No problem, the BMW ABS works perfectly and instills a lot of confidence in the pilot. Jacko maneuvers the GS over the wide handlebars in an inclined position and whizzes through the curve with his knee on the ground under the confused eyes of an oncoming motorist.

Yamaha FJR 1300


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Yamaha FJR 1300.

The FJR doesn’t have that much sport to offer. The Japanese cargo ship is a travel steamer par excellence. Electrically adjustable windshield, lockable storage compartment, heated grips, case system, semi-automatic if required – the FJR pulls out all the stops to make the pilot’s journey as comfortable as possible. The seating position matches this: relaxed knee angle, comfortable and height-adjustable bench, wide handlebars, that’s how you can live it. However, this luxury has its price, not only in financial terms – the FJR 1300 A costs an impressive 17,395 euros – but also in terms of weight, the Japanese is way ahead of the other six country road bikes: 305 kg.

Is that good for the Black Forest? Stefan has no choice. The others have long since disappeared into the maze of curves and he has to make do with the FJR. Well, at least it’s comfortable. He steams off and directs the Yamaha through the first corners. Goes better than with the 2007 model. The Bridgestone BT021 take the FJR some of their stubbornness, but their peculiarities are still annoying: Stefan can only encourage the fat man to give in with effort.

It stands up on the brakes and on bumps, and it is not really calm in the curve. In addition, there is the very limited lean angle, which gives the main stand ground contact even in solo fashion. No, curves are not the job of an FJR 1300. A little resigned, Stefan pulls on the smooth-running gas tap at the end of the curve. Holla, it works. The large displacement lets the weight be forgotten for a short time, the 1300s pushes the 1300s forward softly and emphatically as if driven by a turbine at low speed, thus degrading the gear indicator almost to a decoration.

Even in the city, everything can be done on the Yamaha in the highest, fifth gear. High speeds make little sense anyway, the power of the engine is rather in the lower range. Nonetheless, the 1300 four-cylinder with 138 hp delivers significantly more power than the six competitors and accelerates the thick ship almost as fast as the 675 cc Triumphs 190 kg super sports car.

The combination brake – actuating the rear brake also controls two pistons on the forehead right brake calliper – does its job properly. Since the facelift in 2008, ABS has been regulating usable, if not perfectly. The others wait at the next ice cream parlor, laugh, talk or enjoy the sun with their eyes closed. "Well, Stefan, how was it?" – "Just wait and see, the touristic part of the route is yet to come, then I’ll put all of you in my pocket." A church clock strikes 5. Birds are chirping. Working days could end like this more often.

Technical specifications

Kawasaki Ninja 250 R

Drive: two-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 24 kW (33 PS) at 11,000 rpm *, 22 Nm at 8200 rpm *, 249 cm³, bore / stroke: 62.0 / 41.2 mm, sealing ratio: 11.6: 1, ignition / injection system, 28 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox

Chassis: light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 64 degrees, caster: 82 mm, wheelbase: 1400 mm, telescopic fork, inner fork tube Ø: 37 mm, central spring strut with deflection adjustable in the spring base, spring travel front / rear: 120/130 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 2.75 x 17"/3.50 x 17", Front tires: 110/70 ZR 17, rear: 130/70 ZR 17, initial tires: IRC Road Winner, 290 mm single-disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the front, 220 mm single-disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the rear

Dimensions and weight: Length / width / height: 2085/715/1115 mm, seat / handlebar height: 775/920 mm, handlebar width: 630 mm, 172 kg fully fueled, front / rear: 47.2 / 52.8%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 19 kW (26 hp) at 138 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 7.5 / 23.1 / – s, pulling speed 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 13.1 / 16.4 s

Top speed: 160 km / h *

Consumption: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 4.7 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which reserve: 17 / k. A. liters, range: 358 km Base price: 4595 euros (plus ancillary costs)

Suzuki Gladius

Drive: two-cylinder 90-degree V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 53 kW (72 PS) at 8400 / min *, 64 Nm at 6400 / min *, 645 cm³, bore / stroke: 81.0 / 62, 6 mm , compression ratio: 11.5: 1, ignition / injection system, 39 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

Chassis: steel tubular frame, steering head angle: 65 degrees, caster: 104 mm, wheelbase: 1445 mm, telescopic fork, Ø fork inner tube: 41 mm, adjustable in the spring base, central spring strut with deflection adjustable in the spring base , spring travel front / rear: 125/130 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 3.5 x 17"/5.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 160/60 ZR 17, initial tires: Dunlop Qualifier, 290 mm double disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the front, 240 mm single-disc brake with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

Dimensions and weight: Length / width / height: 2150/860/1280 mm, seat / handlebar height: 790/1040 mm, handlebar width: 675 mm, 201 kg with a full tank, front / rear: 47.8 / 52.2%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 53 kW (72 PS) at 169 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.9 / 8.2 / – s, pulling power 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 5.7 / 6.2 s

Top speed: 200 km / h *

Consumption: Fuel type: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 4.9 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which reserve: 14.5 / k. A. liters, range: 294 km.

Base price: 6290 euros (plus ancillary costs)

Triumph Daytona 675

Drive: three-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 92 kW (125 HP) at 12,600 / min *, 72 Nm at 11,750 / min *, 675 cm³, bore / stroke: 74.0 / 52.3 mm, compression ratio: 12.65: 1, ignition / injection system, 44 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

Chassis: light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.1 degrees, caster: 89 mm, wheelbase: 1395 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 41 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression (high- & Low-speed). Central spring strut with deflection adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression level (high- & Low-speed), spring travel front / rear: 120/130 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/5.50 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17, first tires: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa "SP", 308 mm double disc brake with radially screwed four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

Dimensions and weight: length / width / height: 2047/790/1101 mm, seat / handlebar height: 840/845 mm, handlebar width: 660 mm, 190 kg fully fueled, front / rear: 51.7 / 48.3%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 82 kW (111 PS) at 230 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.4 / 5.9 / 10.1 s, pulling speed 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 4.7 / 5.5 s

Top speed: 263 km / h *

Consumption: Great unleaded, average test consumption: 5.8 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which Reserve: 17.4 / k. A. liters, range: 302 km

Base price: 10,990 euros (plus ancillary costs, automatic switchgear 329 euros surcharge, carbon muffler cover 224 euros)

KTM 990 Adventure

Drive: two-cylinder 75-degree V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 78 kW (106 PS) at 8250 / min *, 100 Nm at 6750 / min, 1000 cm³, bore / stroke: 101.0 / 62.4 mm, compression ratio : 11.5: 1, ignition / injection system, 48 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

Frame: Steel space frame, steering head angle: 63.4 degrees, caster: 119 mm, wheelbase: 1570 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 48 mm, adjustable in spring base, compression and rebound, directly hinged central spring strut adjustable in spring base, Rebound and compression, spring travel front / rear: 210/210 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 3.5 x 17"/5.50 x 17", Forehead tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17, initial tires: Pirelli Scorpion MT 90, 300 mm double disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the front, 240 mm single-disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the rear

Dimensions and weight: Length / width / height: 2300/920/1440 mm, seat / handlebar height: 870/1150 mm, handlebar width: 760 mm, 233 kg fully fueled, front / rear: 49.6 / 50.4%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 69 kW (93 hp) at 195 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.8 / 7.2 / 16.9 s, pulling speed 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 5.9 / 6.4 s

Top speed: 210 km / h *

Consumption: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 6.5 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which Reserve: 19.5 / 4 liters, range: 292 km

Base price: 13,295 euros (plus ancillary costs)

Honda CBF 1000

Drive: four-cylinder in-line engine, 72 kW (98 PS) at 8000 / min *, 93 Nm at 6500 / min *, 998 cm³, boron / stroke: 75.0 / 56.5 mm, compression ratio: 11: 1, ignition / Injection system, 36 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

Chassis: light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 64 degrees, caster: 110 mm, wheelbase: 1480 mm, telescopic fork, inner fork tube diameter: 41 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage, directly hinged central spring strut, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage, Suspension travel front / rear: 120/120 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/5.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 160/60 ZR 17, first tires: Michelin Pilot Road, 296 mm double disc brake with three-piston floating calipers at the front, 240 mm single disc with three-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS / CBS

Dimensions and weight: Length / width / height: 2140/890/1270 mm, seat / handlebar height: 785-815 / 1040 mm, handlebar width: 675 mm, 252 kg with a full tank, front / rear: 49/51%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 70 kW (95 hp) at 177 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.7 / 7.1 / 15.8 s, pulling power 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 7.1 / 5.1 s

Top speed: 228 km / h *

Consumption: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 6.0 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which reserve: 19 / k. A. liters, range: 315 km

Base price: 8750 euros (more Nk, ABS 700 euros surcharge)

BMW R 1200 GS

Drive: two-cylinder boxer engine, four valves / cylinder, 77 kW (105 PS) at 7000 / min *, 115 Nm at 5750 / min *, 1170 cm³, bore / stroke: 101.0 / 73.0 mm, compression ratio: 12, 0: 1, ignition / injection system, 47 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated single-disc dry clutch, six-speed gearbox, gimbal, G-Kat

Chassis: load-bearing engine-gearbox assembly with steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 64.3 degrees, caster: 101 mm, wheelbase: 1507 mm, Telelever, Ø inner tube: 41 mm, electro-hydraulically adjustable spring base and rebound damping, central spring strut, spring base and Adjustable rebound damping, spring travel front / rear: 190/200 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 2.50 x 19"/4.00 x 17", Front tires: 110/80 H 19, rear: 150/70 H 17, initial tires: Bridgestone Battlewing 501/502, 305 mm double disc brakes with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 265 mm single-disc brakes with two- piston floating calipers at the rear, ABS and ASC

Dimensions and weight: length / width / height: 2250/950/1390 mm, seat / handlebar height: 850/1140 mm, handlebar width: 820 mm, 244 kg fully fueled, front / rear: 50.0 / 50.0%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 75.2 kW (102 PS) at 216 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.6 / 6.7 / 16.8 s, pulling power 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 5.0 / 5.2 s

Top speed: 213 km / h *

Consumption: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 6.2 liters / 100 km, tank capacity (of which reserve): 20.0 / 4 liters, range: 323 km

Base price: 12,800 euros (plus Nk, ABS 1080 euros surcharge, ASC 300 euros, ESA 680 euros)

Yamaha FJR 1300 A

Drive: four-cylinder in-line engine, oven valves / cylinder, 105.5 kW (144 PS) at 8000 / min *, 134 Nm at 7000 / min, 1298 cm³, bore / stroke: 79.0 / 66.2 mm, compression ratio: 10.8: 1, ignition / injection system, 42 mm throttle valves , hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, five-speed gearbox, gimbal, SLS, G-Kat

Chassis: light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 64 degrees, caster: 109 mm, wheelbase: 1515 mm, telescopic fork, Ø fork inner tube: 48 mm, adjustable in spring base, compression and rebound, central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base and rebound, spring travel front / rear: 135/125 mm

Wheels and brakes: light alloy cast wheels, 3.5 x 17"/5.50 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17, initial tires: Bridgestone BT021, 320 mm double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 282 mm single disc with two-piston floating caliper at the rear

Dimensions and weight: Length / width / height: 2200/960/1450 mm, seat / handlebar height: 790/860 mm, handlebar width: 690 mm, 305 kg with a full tank, front / rear: 49.6 / 50.4%

Rear wheel power in last gear: 95 kW (129 hp) at 223 km / h

Performance: Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.3 / 5.4 / 11.0 s, pulling power 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 5.8 / 5.8 s

Top speed: 245 km / h *

Consumption: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 5.9 liters / 100 km, tank capacity / of which Reserve: 25 / k. A. liters, range: 425 km

Base price: 17 395 euros (plus ancillary costs)

Conclusion


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Conclusion: KTM and Honda share the country road crown. Tea Adventure is particularly popular with the engine, the chassis is more geared towards offroad. The CBF does everything inconspicuously, but well. Third place for the Triumph. The performance is right, the sitting position is uncomfortable in the long run. The BMW doesn’t do anything really bad, but is not completely convincing – 4th place. FJR and Gladius are close to each other on 5 and 6, but drive each other completely different. The small Kawa suffers from the weak engine and the minimalist basic concept.

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