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Comparison test: naked bikes on the racetrack

Country road fighter on the racetrack

Content of

It has to be extreme – that shows what is really inside you. According to this extreme athlete saying, PS pulled out to bolt down the race track with strong naked bikes and to tickle the last of the uncovered powerhouses.

In such a test life you sometimes wonder what that is about. Why, for example, let go of a motorcycle that growls aggressively and cocks wildly, delivers over 150 hp, has a rock-hard chassis and forbids all comfort? Well, such a racing motorcycle, you will now say what else is it supposed to do. And basically you are right, except that we are not talking about racing bikes here. One should be surprised, or not?

E.Actually, this astonished shaking of the head is already the test result, which we don’t want to anticipate at this point. Nevertheless, we are not already telling you everything, but we are really happy to tell you that this incredulous emotion was accompanied by a big grin. An irrational, anarchic, adrenaline-charged smirk. How it came about?

PS is PS, and that’s why we once again showed the proud middle finger to the sober test concept, packed a colorful mixture of the bare country road glory, carted it to Oschersleben and really grabbed it by the horns. Finally in the box were the significantly revised Benelli TnT 1130, which now bears the sonorous addition of R 160, the current Kawasaki Z 1000, the also current MV Agusta Brutale 1090 RR, the race-proven KTM 990 Super Duke R and the evergreen, the 1050 series Drilling Speed ​​Triple from Triumph.

So that we don’t completely smear the participants at the PS Racecamp on their racing cars, we put the test persons on the bustling and sticky Michelin Power One, preheated them properly and started.

The motors


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The redesigned engine with a red tornado head rocks and roars enthusiastically, especially when the race mapping is activated and the dB eater is removed.

The Benelli conjures up a sound in the box that the neighbors literally come running. To do this, we removed the dB eater and pushed in the race mapping. The test bench attests to this trim recommended by the manufacturer for the slope 153 HP.

The revision of the new R 160 doesn’t seem really wild. Only the motor housing and the head got a new mold that is supposed to improve the quality. The head comes from the Benelli Superbike Tornado, which probably works better aerodynamically. Also new are the two camshafts, which were also taken from the Tornado, but were given different valve times for use on country roads. The compression was changed and the mapping was also adjusted. Successful measures for the racetrack. The result is questionable on the country road.

The TnT 1130 underpins the first sound impression on the slopes. There, the three-cylinder presses a torque shaft to the rear wheel, which literally catapults the rider out of the corner. This happens with tremendous vibrations that clearly penetrate the handlebars, but with the force of the drive and the sound of the rear silencer and airbox, this character rocks up to a brutal experience that you could think that the Benelli left deep furrows in the asphalt. These fireworks take place between 6000 and almost 10,000 rpm. That fits perfectly on the racetrack. In this area, the animal literally craves speed and looks very lively. The only real reproach that one has to make this impetuous Italian is the hard throttle response, which acknowledges corrections with a wild jolt in long arcs like the Hasseröder or the hotel curve.

We have not only heard that the new TnT is problematic in everyday life, but that can be seen when leaving the racetrack at rolling speed to the pit. Below 5500 rpm, the TnT plagues with violent constant-speed jolts and is really offended – pretty naughty! The gearbox is also clumsy and the dry clutch requires a lot of manual force. Quirks that the Kawasaki Z 1000 completely misses. In its transmission, the gears slide smoothly and precisely. The clutch is easy to move, at most it engages a little very quickly.


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There was plenty of fuel for the five unfamiliar visitors.

This impression of a gentle giant continues in the character of the four-in-a-row. The 1000 series pushes wonderfully evenly through the rev range. The throttle response is perfect. And the thing is under pressure! The engine even seems to have this everywhere. Shower up and the kawa signs on. Compared to the Benelli, this is much less spectacular, but the Z also moves forward really quickly. The Kawa does a bit of bad boy in the slightly low-rev range. Then she gasps bloodthirstily from the airbox.

The KTM Super Duke R has long since received the bad boy image. It is firmly established as a racing bike thanks to the Super Duke Battle brand cup. But now, not among your peers, it immediately becomes apparent that the two-cylinder is good at top performance, but has to give up a bit when it sprints out of the curve. At medium speeds, it seems tough, has to be turned accordingly and thus offers a very narrow usable power band in direct combat. At the end of this it rumbles into the limiter in a rustic way. In general, the Ösi-Twin is of the rustic variety and rattles to itself. The KTM compensates for this with a decent throttle response and overall clean engine characteristics.

On the other hand, the transmission is less beautiful. Sometimes it really wants to be kicked when things have to be done quickly, in other words: it is unsteady and imprecise. The transmission of the MV Agusta is also brittle. Upshifting works without the clutch only with a firm foot, which costs time. On the Brutale, however, it can be brought back in through the engine. The four-cylinder turns exemplary through midfield and seems to gain punch again before the five-digit mark. But then it gets tough, nothing really happens, and the pilot either has to wait for the limiter or the knowledge that he shouldn’t squint at the gearshift light for that long and then push into the next gear as soon as the 10,000 rpm mark is reached.

At least in sports mapping, the very hard throttle response is noticeable. In the standard mapping, this is much more gentle, without changing the character of the smooth but powerful engine significantly. Switching the mapping is a bit cryptic, by the way.

The Triumph Speed ​​Triple doesn’t know anything like that. It’s a bike, an engine, a wide handlebar – done. It also has a gearshift light for racing, but it doesn’t really feel at home here. The British triple engine itself, on the other hand, is competitive. Although it brings up the rear when it comes to performance measurement, the Italian faction in particular also shuts it down at medium speeds, but its performance is linear and the overall impression is good-natured. Well, these are features that don’t really spark the euphoria on the slopes, as Mittester and IDM Supersport driver Pascal Eckhardt put it: "It doesn’t set a highlight on the racetrack." For that I had to "corner" attest the Triumph engine an impeccable response behavior. The Triumph already knows from the past that the gearbox is stuck as a point of criticism, but it’s not as bony as the MV’s.

Power-Nakeds test comparison: Part 2


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The fully adjustable dampers respond well both at the front and rear and are reasonably tight for use on the racetrack.

Chassis and brake
Everyone should have noticed that we were enthusiastic about the Benelli engine. But the chassis also made a great impression. It is true that the fork sinks in a long way while standing and has an unbelievable 46 millimeters of negative spring travel with the rider mounted (approx. 80 kg). But what the fork still leaves in terms of damping is a tight package, fits neatly for Oschersleben, gives the driver a nice feel for the front and even allows the load to be pulled into an even closer line – whoosh, inside and through.

The Benelli also leaves nothing to be desired in terms of accuracy. It folds down cleanly, lies well in the curve and offers a remarkable freedom from lean angles. Similar picture on the hindquarters, except that the strut is much tighter. In the meantime, there is a high-speed pressure stage at the TnT for the first time, but we had almost completely closed it. The highlight of the Benelli is the brake. The wave brake discs and the four-piston calipers bite down absolutely in keeping with the race track, and over the full turn without losing stability.

The Z 1000 handles braking attacks with its easily adjustable brake that is also very steadfast. The only thing that has to be mentioned here is that your ABS is not suitable for the race track. The control range starts late, but if you brake on the very last groove and the ABS suddenly starts to control, you will be sent straight on without much delay. When the control range ends, the fully deployed brake almost throws you over your handlebars. On the racetrack, mind you!

The chassis of the Kawa is that of a highway burner. In this respect, it looks quite soft and comfortable, but still does well on the slopes and masters this balancing act surprisingly successfully. Since nothing pumps, there is hardly any unrest in the chassis and it turns – probably due to the Michelin – completely without grumbling. Your biggest mistake is the very moderate lean angle. In left turns, the stand grinds first, then the exhaust plate.

This is the hour for KTM. None of the test candidates offers as much lean angle as the Super Duke. The tight damping is perfectly coordinated at the front and back and meanwhile the response is simply great, the merciless toughness of the first R-Dukes story. The KTM is also very handy and, because of its high center of gravity, throws itself greedily into corners. When folded down, the Austrian is a little more nervous than the Benelli and the Kawa, but the target is never out of sight. Only on the straights are the smallest impulses enough to make the 990 oscillate easily. A phenomenon that has never occurred on other tires on this bike and can therefore be blamed on Michelin.


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The brake is great, shows no fading and is easy to adjust. The ABS, which regulates late, is still useless on the slopes.

The brake is appropriate because it is easy to dose and transparent. The Brembo blocks of the KTM do not have the very last bite of the TnT, but they are still sharper than the stoppers of the MV Agusta. Still, they’re not bad. But the Brutale gets quite nervous with heavy braking attacks, then the stern lurches. The compact bike with the short wheelbase wants to mill more than slow down. The nervousness on the brakes can also be found in long arcs, in which the MV tilts and suddenly falls into even deeper lean angles. Which in this case usually results in a dragging footrest, because the MV’s lean angle is not on the level of the Benelli and certainly not that of the KTM.

But the 1090 RR spoils you with a creamy handling. As agile as the MV acts in the tight chicane or the Shell-S, lets itself be thrown from one incline into the other, none of the five does that otherwise. For the last spark of euphoria at this point, the feeling for the front wheel is unfortunately missing a bit. But all in all, the Brutale’s dampers work at a high level, respond cleanly and offer large reserves.

No trace of it at Triumph. Your chassis is your biggest flaw. There is disharmony between the strut and the fork. The spring is too hard, the adjustment range too poor, the fork too soft and not in harmony with the hindquarters. The motorcycle is constantly on the move. The Speed ​​Triple is also the most unwieldy in the field. It is true that the Michelin also ensure agile folding down, but the driver still has to lead it with the greatest effort in this test. In addition, there is the moderate lack of lean angle in the test field, which means that the ideal line often moves far away in long arcs. The Triumph’s brakes are on a good level, but it makes the other four shine brighter in this regard.

The big picture


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The five Nakeds do not feel uncomfortable on the racetrack, a completely new racing feeling is spreading.

The unobstructed view of the bike, the uninterrupted impression of driving, hardly any external interference – that is the advantage of the racetrack. You might think about how useful it is to test these bikes here, but we noticed a lot more anyway, and precisely because of that. This applies above all to the sitting position, the freedom of movement of the feet, the width and cranking of the handlebars, or the equipment.

The Super Duke R is in a league of its own when it comes to seating position. Sitting high on the bike, nothing at all reminds you of a street racer. But it works when you get used to it. The active seating position close to and above the handlebars, which is also the widest in the field, gives you a very special feeling. The hard bench connects the popometer with the carriage and there is enough space on the notches to support hanging-off with the appropriate foot position.

The Benelli embeds its rider deeper in the bike, enables a very active riding style and good feedback thanks to the tight seat. Its notches are a bit slippery, however, and the handlebar fittings are sloppily attached, they wobble violently. The Kawa is a large motorcycle that can still be moved quite actively. However, the foot area is very built in, so that you have to twist the bones tremendously when hanging off. The handlebars are quite narrow, the offset fits.

Anyone who drives actively on the MV will feel the movement of the single-sided swing arm in left-hand bends, because the heel rests directly on it. The bike is very compact, which makes it difficult for taller riders anyway. An edge below the bench is very annoying when hanging off. Everything else about the Brutale looks very valuable.

You can really tell the speed triple over the years. With it, the driver sits too far away from the handlebars, and there is almost no space in the foot area for active collaboration. The wide handlebars also have an uncomfortable offset for wild action. We can look forward to the next Speedy, which should already be in the making for 2011. Maybe then we’ll see each other again on the racetrack.

Conclusion: Unbelievable, the Benelli wins this test. It owes that to the test concept, showing it as a radical brutal bike. But you can ask yourself who needs something like that. In response, Benelli should actually ignite a TnT Cup. The Z 1000 is doing well and puts the KTM under enormous pressure, especially with its great engine, although the Austrian race bike takes some getting used to, but is fully suitable. The Brutale also does a fabulous job, only suffering from its compact design, with which it likes to offend even on country roads with medium-sized Central Europeans of normal size. The Speed ​​Triple is struggling with age. The engine is still a fine piece of engineering, but the chassis and overall look of the Triumph call for a new version.

Technical specifications


Drawing: archive

The performance diagram of the five naked bikes.

No wonder that the Benelli tears so. Apart from a mighty dent between 3000 and 4000 rpm and another slump around 6000 rpm – which can spoil the fun on the country road – the Italian pushes ahead in a superior manner in racing trim. This is followed by the Brutale, which, however, visibly struggles beyond 10,000 rpm to top it up. The Speedy and the Z 1000, which are especially strong at the top, are good at this. The test bench confirms that the KTM feels tough in the middle. He also unmasked a huge dent shortly before the top performance.

Benelli TnT 1130 R 160


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The Benelli TnT 1130 R 160.

drive:
Three-cylinder in-line engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 114 kW (155 PS) at 10,300 / min *, 120 Nm at 8,000 / min *, 1131 cm3, bore / stroke 88.0 / 62.0 mm, compression ratio 11.2: 1, ignition / injection system, 53 mm throttle valves, dry clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

landing gear:
Tubular steel / light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 65.0 degrees, caster: 99 mm, wheelbase: 1443 mm. Upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 50 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage (low / high). Suspension travel front / rear: 120/115 mm

Wheels and brakes:

Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/6.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/50 ZR 17. First tires: Michelin Pilot Power, 320 mm double disc brake with radially screwed four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 240 mm single disc with double-piston floating caliper at the rear

Measurements and weight:

Length / width / height 2113/800/1200 mm, seat / handlebar height 820/1040 mm, handlebar width 730 mm, 225 kg fully fueled, f / r 52.4% / 47.6%

Rear wheel power in last gear:

104 kW (141 PS) at 258 km / h

Driving performance with dB-Eater and regular mapping:
Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h 3.0 s / 5.5 s / 9.6 s
Pulling speed 50-100 / 100-150 km / h 4.8 s / 4.7 s

Top speed: 260 km / h *

consumption:
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption / country road: 8.3 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 16 liters, range: 193 km

Base price: 13,990 euros (plus ancillary costs)

Kawasaki Z 1000


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The Kawasaki Z 1000.

drive:
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 101.5 kW (138 PS) at 9600 / min *, 110 Nm at 7800 / min *, 1043 cm³, bore / stroke: 77.0 / 56.0 mm, compression: 11, 8 : 1, ignition / injection system, 38 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

landing gear:
Light alloy central tube frame, steering head angle: 65.5 degrees, caster: 103 mm, wheelbase: 1440 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 41 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage, central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base and Rebound, front / rear travel: 120/138 mm

Wheels and brakes:

Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/6.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/50 ZR 17, first tires: Pirelli Diablo Rosso "K", 300 mm double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 250 mm single disc brake with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

Measurements and weight:
Length / width / height: 2100/865/1245 mm, seat / handlebar height: 815/1035 mm, handlebar width: 715 mm, 222 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 50.0 / 50.0%

Rear wheel power in last gear:
94 kW (128 PS) at 215 km / h

Driving performance:
Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.3 / 5.2 / 9.9 s
Pulling speed 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 4.2 / 4.1 s

Top speed: 240 km / h *

consumption:
Fuel type: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 7.9 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 15 liters, range: 191 km

Base price: 11,295 euros (plus ancillary costs)

KTM 990 Super Duke R.


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The KTM 990 Super Duke R.

drive:
Two-cylinder V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 97 kW (132 HP) at 10,000 / min *, 102 Nm at 8,000 / min *, 999 cm3, bore / stroke 101.0 / 62.4 mm, compression ratio 11.5: 1, ignition / injection system, 52 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox

landing gear:
Steel tubular frame, steering head angle: 67.3 degrees, caster: 94 mm, wheelbase: 1450 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 48 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Directly hinged strut, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 135/150 mm

Wheels and brakes:
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/5.50 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17. First tires: Pirelli Dragon Supercorsa. 320 mm double disc brake with radially screwed four-piston fixed calipers and radial brake pump at the front, 240 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

Measurements and weight:
Length / width / height 2100/910/1240 mm, seat / handlebar height 870/1040 mm, handlebar width 750 mm, 203 kg fully fueled, front / rear 51.8% / 48.2%

Rear wheel power in last gear:

95 kW (128 PS) at 245 km / h

Performance:
Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h 3.2 s / 5.6 s / 9.9 s
50-100 / 100-150 km / h 5.0 s / 5.2 s

Top speed: 240 km / h *

consumption:
Fuel type: Super. Average test consumption: 7.4 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 18.5 liters, range: 250 km

Base price: 12,495 euros (plus additional costs)

MV Agusta Brutale 1090 RR


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The MV Agusta Brutale 1090 RR.

Drive:
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 106 kW (144 PS) at 10600 / min *, 115 Nm at 8000 / min *, 1078 cm³, bore / stroke: 79.0 / 55.0 mm, compression ratio: 13.0: 1, ignition / injection system, 46 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath slipper clutch, six-speed gearbox

landing gear:
Steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 65.0 degrees, caster: 103.5 mm, wheelbase: 1438 mm. Upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 50 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 130/120 mm

Wheels and brakes:

Forged alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17"/6.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17. First tires: Dunlop Qualifier RR. 320 mm double disc brake with four-piston fixed callipers at the front, 210 mm single disc with four-piston fixed calliper at the rear

Measurements and weight:
Length / width / height: 2009/850/1240 mm, seat / handlebar height: 830/1020 mm, handlebar width: 705 mm, 214 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 51/49%

Rear wheel power in last gear:
93 kW (127 PS) at 221 km / h

Performance:
Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h 3.3 / 5.7 / 9.8 s
Pulling 50-100 / 100-150 km / h 3.7 / 3.6 s

Top speed: 265 km / h *

consumption:
Fuel type: Fuel type: Super. Average test consumption: 9.4 liters / 100 km, tank capacity: 23 liters, range: 246 km

Base price: 18,500 euros (plus additional costs)

Triumph Speed ​​Triple


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The Triumph Speed ​​Triple.

drive:
Three-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 97 kW (132 hp) at 9250 / min *, 105 Nm at 7500 / min *, 1050 cm3, bore / stroke 79.0 / 71.4 mm, compression ratio 12.0: 1, Ignition / injection system, 46 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat

landing gear:
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.5 degrees, caster: 84 mm, wheelbase: 1429 mm. Upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 45 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage, central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage. Suspension travel front / rear: 120/140 mm

Wheels and brakes:

Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/5.50 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17. First tires: Metzeler Sportec M3, 320 mm double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc brake with two-piston floating caliper at the rear

Measurements and weight:

Length / width / height: 2050/900/1250 mm, seat / handlebar height: 850/1020 mm, handlebar width: 740 mm, 223 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 48.7 / 51.3%

Rear wheel power in last gear:

92 kW (125 PS) at 236 km / h

Driving performance:
Acceleration 0-100 / 150/200 km / h: 3.2 / 6.0 / 10.8 s
Thrust 50-100 / 100-150 km / h: 4.4 / 5.1 s

Top speed: 240 km / h *

consumption:
Fuel type: Super unleaded, average test consumption: 7.2 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 18 liters, range: 248 km

Base price: 11,740 euros (plus ancillary costs)

1st place: Benelli TnT 1130 R 160


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After this, you can hardly imagine the Benelli TnT 1130 R 160 on the road.

Category engine:
In race mapping without dB-Eater, the Benelli goes off sonorous like Schmidt’s cat. The throttle response and the gearbox are less supple.

5 out of 5 stars

Category chassis:
Why the fork has to sink so deeply while standing remains a mystery. Nevertheless, the damping works well, the feedback is good. This brake is great.

4 out of 5 stars

Category ergonomics:
Good workplace with a firm seat for active driving. The wide handlebar fits in the crank. The pegs are a bit too slippery, however.

4 out of 5 stars

Category driving fun:
The TnT puts you in the mood on the slopes. The hunt for the last second is not an issue because of the construction, but the sound and feel are great.

5 out of 5 stars

PS judgment:
You don’t want to imagine the Benelli big on the street. Should she just enjoy this victory? She can really have fun running.

18 out of 20 stars

2nd place: KTM 990 Super Duke R


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The Super Duke is also simply fun on the racetrack. A little more power couldn’t hurt, though.

Category engine:
The twin hits the gas nicely and fits here well due to its speed greed. Nevertheless, it is a bit tough in the middle and the gearbox is too imprecise.

3 out of 5 stars

Category chassis:
Lean angle without end, tight dampers with good response, steering damper to it, it is handy, has a good brake, but its peculiarity.

4 out of 5 stars

Category ergonomics:
The rider sits high on the KTM, almost feeling like a supermoto. The hard bench allows you to slide back and forth perfectly.

4 out of 5 stars

Category driving fun:
The Super Duke R is simply fun on the racetrack. Anyone who has got used to the peculiarity can really squeeze it out. A little more juice would be cool.

5 out of 5 stars

PS judgment:
It’s not for nothing that the KTM competes in a successful brand cup. You only miss something in comparison with more powerful bikes.

16 out of 20 stars

3rd place: Kawasaki Z 1000


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The performance is right, but in the corners the slight lean angle is noticeable.

Category engine:
The Z-motor suggests pressure from all positions, its responsiveness is impeccable, and the silky smooth running is impressive. The gearbox slips clean.

5 out of 5 stars

Category chassis:
The cushioning is mercilessly dedicated to its purpose and therefore soft, but it still works quite well. The freedom of inclination is poor.

3 out of 5 stars

Category ergonomics:
The workstation on the Z 1000 is not quite as active as on some others, but is suitable for real action. However, everything is built in in the foot area.

3 out of 5 stars

Category driving fun:
The Kawa is amazingly fun on the slopes. The tire contributes to this when handling, but the engine is the big plus, the balancing act succeeds.

4 out of 5 stars

PS judgment:
Predictable without nasty properties, the Z gets going. The drive is overall cream, the chassis is good. Who came up with this seat cover??

15 out of 20 stars

4th place: MV Agusta Brutale 1090 RR


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The Brutale doesn’t make a bad impression on the racetrack. But it gets a little uncomfortable for taller drivers.

Category engine:
The Brutale engine is characterized by its smoothness and punch. The hard throttle response and the brittle transmission speak against full marks.

4 out of 5 stars

Category chassis:
The handling inspires in fast alternating curves and when turning. But it is wobbly in long arches. The dampers are good, as are the brakes.

3 out of 5 stars

Category ergonomics:
The MV is a little too compact for drivers from 1.80 m. An edge under the bench peeks when hanging-off, and the arms are bent too much.

3 out of 5 stars

Category driving fun:
Sprinkle up and wave, sometimes left, sometimes right, cha-cha-cha. It’s fun, but the dance continues unintentionally on the brakes, and it’s wobbly too.

4 out of 5 stars

PS judgment:
Bravo Brutale! Thank you very much, it was really fun. You don’t always have to have that, but if it should be like that again, we’re happy to be there.

14 out of 20 stars

5th place: Triumph Speed ​​Triple


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The Speed ​​Triple has dominated for many years, but now it’s time to adapt to the modern age.

Category engine:
The Speedy’s engine is the weakest, but what is 5 HP? You only notice this deficiency in the tip. Transmission, of course.

3 out of 5 stars

Category chassis:
Please remake, triumph! Somehow it doesn’t fit so well on the country road anymore, but on the slopes it doesn’t work very well.

2 out of 5 stars

Category ergonomics:
There is a large fuel drum between the driver and the handlebars – it is decoupled. Everything is built in in the foot area, and the incline is very modest.

3 out of 5 stars

Category driving fun:
The growling of the Triple, its linear power output – the engine itself is the most fun. The rest is a bit old average.

3 out of 5 stars

PS judgment:
Good old Speedy. For years she tore down everything on naked bikes. The others didn’t sleep. We are eagerly awaiting an answer.

11 out of 20 stars

Michelin Power One


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The Michelin Power One.

For the sake of comparability, but above all for the necessary grip, PS padded all of the test candidates with the Michelin Power One super sports tire. This ensured playful handling, which was particularly beneficial for the Z 1000 and which should also have increased the accuracy of the Speed ​​Triple. However, he gave the KTM some trouble when it came to straight-line stability. When it was cold, we drove the Power One at 2.1 bar at the front and 1.9 bar at the rear. We put on tire warmers for durability and quick grip.

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