Ducati 999-1199, Kawasaki Z 1000 and Yamaha YZF-R1 in a comparison test

fact

Ducati 999/1199, Kawasaki Z 1000 and Yamaha YZF-R1

Generation comparison – 10 years apart

Content of

Ten years is a long time when boys become men. What has happened in this range of sports motorcycles and naked bikes? PS examined the models Ducati 999/1199, Kawasaki Z 1000 and Yamaha YZF-R1 from the years 2004 and 2014.

But you grew up! “Says the grandma to the grandchild after she has not seen it for several months. When PS testers stand in front of ten-year-old motorcycles, they utter equally clever slogans, unpack ole camels and tease around a little. “Do you remember, back in 2004 in Valencia. In the 1000 comparison … "" What do you mean? "" Come on, you know! "" Oh stop it, I had already suppressed it. That stupid fall in the first right turn, even before a single picture was taken. ”“ Exactly, you on the new one Yamaha YZF-R1 – and sink it straight into the gravel … "

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Ducati 999/1199, Kawasaki Z 1000 and Yamaha YZF-R1
Generation comparison – 10 years apart

Kawasaki Z 1000 and the innovative Yamaha YZF-R1. Their current successors are available for comparison – with the exception of the YZF-R1. Due to the lack of availability, we had to fall back on a 2011 model without traction control.


fact

Boys become men, girls become women. And bikes are changing too.

The Yamaha YZF-R1 shows how much the Japanese have fine-tuned the subtleties of superbikes over the past decade. Minimal retouching of the geometry is part of every facelift, but the switch from the unusual five-valve to the conventional four-valve cylinder head and the introduction of the cross-plane crankshaft are not. Big changes also in the twin world. Ten years ago the Honda VTR 1000 SP and the Aprilia RSV 1000 were still wrestling for the crown with the Ducati 999, today there is a dance of death. Only Bolognese still offer a superbike twin with the Ducati 1199 Panigale S..

In contrast, there is continuity in the naked bike segment, represented here by the Kawasaki Z 1000. A large four-cylinder fires a still spectacularly styled, undisguised motorcycle. But here too, in addition to the design, the characteristics have changed considerably. More on this on the following pages. To get in the mood, we prefer to look back to 2004 and remember Michael Schumacher’s seventh Formula 1 world championship title, Otto "Rehakles" Rehagel, who became European soccer champion with the Greek national team, the introduction of the practice fee and the summer Olympics in Greece.

Yamaha YZF-R1 (2004) and Yamaha YZF-R1 (2011)


fact

The old and the new Yamaha YZF-R1 are fundamentally the same.

Never in recent history has a manufacturer changed the characteristics of a model as drastically as Yamaha did with the R1 in 2009. With the crank pin offset by 90 degrees ("cross-plane" technology), the in-line four-cylinder mimics the firing order and thus the sound of a genuine V4. The drive sounds very civilized and cultivated. But in comparison with the threatening, dull-aggressive rattle of the Yamaha YZF-R1 from 2004 (model code: RN 12), the current version sounds as harmless as a chuckling baby. The different soundscape also affects the driving style. Here the ancestor who constantly encourages her driver to burn through the area with a wide open shower and high speeds. There the new one (code: RN 22), whose bubbling, however, works like anti-aggression training.

But anyone who concludes from this that the RN 22 is just a soft-washed athlete is very wrong! Because with its higher power almost over the entire speed range, it marches like hell and shoots out of the corners on the rear wheel again and again. The clearest difference in power and torque is up to around 5000 rpm. There the new one punches much more powerfully than her ancestor, which also gives her better pulling power. In addition, it powers wonderfully evenly through the rev range, it doesn’t know the infamous break-in of the "old" Yamaha YZF-R1. When it comes to running smoothness, the new one is slightly ahead, because its characteristic pounding is more pleasant than the fine-nerved vibrations of the 2004 model. The “real” four-in-a-row counters with aggressiveness and hot-bloodedness, is clearly more emotional. Nevertheless, the new one clearly decides the engine rating for itself.


PS

Except for the range between 5000 rpm and 6500 rpm, the new one punches more powerfully through the rev range than its predecessor. Its characteristic hitch at medium speeds is clearly noticeable and accompanied the four-in-line from the beginning to the end of its construction period.

When it comes to the chassis, the current Yamaha YZF-R1 is at least on par in every criterion and surpasses the 2004 Yam in some features. But the differences are so small that you can only feel them in direct comparison. The new one arrows slightly more stable through the corners, and the shock absorber filters short, hard edges a little better. In addition, she only stirs the handlebars briefly when shooting over lousy terrain, while the deflections on the older version are more pronounced. In addition, the younger version stands up less when braking in an inclined position, and the six-piston pliers on its stoppers can be adjusted slightly better. On the other hand, there is a tie in terms of handling and accuracy. Both angles precisely and extremely light-footed and circle hair-fine on the given line – world class! Fans of driver assistance are happy that the new one offers traction control. Due to the lack of availability of this model, we chased a 2011 yam through the area that does not yet have this feature.

But these already had the bulky exhaust mufflers. They are undoubtedly one of the reasons why the RN 22 has sold relatively poorly. Anyone who has not been able to warm up to a current Yamaha YZF-R1 because of this can be happy. Because Yamaha has recently been equipping its superbike with sharp Akrapovic end bags at no extra charge. This visually moves it a bit closer to its gripping predecessor, which keeps up surprisingly well and is by no means old-fashioned!
Volkmar Jacob

Data


fact

The engine of the old does not compete with the new.

Yamaha YZF-R1 (2004)

drive 

Four-cylinder in-line engine, five valves / cylinder, 126 kW (172 hp) at 12,500 rpm *,
104 Nm at 10,500 rpm *, 998 cm³, bore / stroke: 77.0 / 53.6 mm, compression-
ratio: 12.3: 1, ignition / injection system, 45 mm throttle valves, mechanical
actuated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain
frame & 
Brakes

Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.0 degrees, caster: 97 mm,
Wheelbase: 1395 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm,
adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with
Deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel
front / rear: 120/130 mm, cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17,
Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/50 ZR 17, test tires: Michelin
Pilot Power 2CT, 320 mm double disc brake with radially struck
Four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper
back
performance 
Max. Rear wheel power **  116.2 kW (158 PS) at 268 km / h
Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.2 s
0-150 km / h: 5.1 s
0-200 km / h: 7.6 s   
Draft ** 50-100 km / h: 5.1 s
100–150 km / h: 3.8 s
Top speed * 285 km / h
measurements and weight Length / width / height: 2060/800/1140 mm, seat / handlebar height: 820/850 mm,
Handlebar width: 655 mm, 203 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 52.4 / 47.5%
consumption Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption:
8.5 liters / 100 km, tank capacity: 18 liters, range: 211 km
Set up
Setup fork stat. neg. travel: 28 mm,
Compression: 8 K open, rebound: 9 K open, level: standard
Setup shock absorber stat. neg. spring travel: 18 mm, pressure level:
3 K open, rebound: 8 K open, level: standard
Base price (2004) 13,295 euros (including additional costs)
All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement

Video: Endurance factory Yamaha YZF-R1

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fact

The cockpit of the new one (left) provides more extensive information and offers a gear indicator, for example.

Yamaha YZF-R1 (2011)

drive 

Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 134 kW (182 hp)
at 12,500 rpm *, 116 Nm at 10,000 rpm *, 998 cm³,
Bore / stroke: 78.0 / 52.2 mm, compression ratio: 12.7: 1,
Ignition / injection system, 45 mm throttle bodies, mechanically operated
Multi-disc oil bath slipper clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain
frame & 
Brakes

Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.0 degrees, caster: 102 mm,
Wheelbase: 1415 mm, upside-down fork, inner fork tube Ø: 43 mm, adjustable
in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable
in spring base, rebound and compression (high / low). Suspension travel front / rear: 120/120 mm,
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17,
rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Michelin Pilot Power, 310 mm double disc brakes
with four-piston fixed calipers attached radially at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear
performance 
Max. Rear wheel power **  120.5 kW (164 PS) at 262 km / h

Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.2 s
0-150 km / h: 5.1 s
0-200 km / h: 7.5 s   
Draft **

50-100 km / h: 4.0 s
100-150 km / h: 3.9 s
Top speed * 285 km / h
measurements and weight

Length / width / height: 2090/775/1120 mm, seat / handlebar height: 815/850 mm,
Handlebar width: 655 mm, 215 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 52.0 / 48.0%
consumption

Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption:
8.9 liters / 100 km, tank capacity: 18 liters, range: 202 km
Set up
Setup fork

stat. neg. spring travel: 36 mm, pressure level: 14 K open,
Rebound stage: 12 K open, level: standard
Setup shock absorber

stat. neg. spring travel: 15 mm, pressure level high / low: complete / 18 K open,
Rebound stage: 5 K open, level: standard
Base price (2004) 15,790 euros (including additional costs)
All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement

rating


fact

The Yamaha YZF-R1 optically moves a bit closer to its gripping predecessor, which keeps up surprisingly well and is by no means a thing of the past!

  Max.
Points 
 
Yamaha 
YZF-R1
2004
Yamaha
YZF-R1
2011
drive
acceleration 10 9 9
Draft 10 7th 8th
Power delivery  10 7th 10
Responsiveness 10 9 9
Load change reaction 10 9 9
Running culture 10 8th 9
Gear actuation 10 8th 8th
Gear ratio 10 9 9
Clutch function 10 5 8th
Traction control 10
Subtotal 100 71 79
landing gear   
Driving stability 10 8th 9
Handiness 10 8th 8th
Cornering stability 10 8th 9
feedback 10 9 9
Suspension tuning in front  10 9 9
Chassis set-up at the rear  10 8th 9
Braking effect 10 9 9
Brake metering 10 8th 9
Erection moment
when braking
10 7th 8th
ABS function 10
Subtotal 100 74 79
Everyday life and driving fun
Sitting position 10 8th 9
Windbreak 10 7th 7th
Furnishing 10 5 6th
consumption 10 4th 3
Driving fun 10 8th 9
Subtotal 50 32 34
Total 250 177 192
placement   2. 1.

Kawasaki Z 1000 (2004) and Kawasaki Z 1000 (2014)


fact

The young Z has an easy game, hurries confidently. Grandma only comes closer again on wrinkled asphalt and narrow country roads of the third order.

The applause was frenetic when in 2003 the "new" Kawasaki Z 1000 came onto the market. The brand fans were euphoric, the trade press delighted by the brand impulsive appearance, and many motorcyclists became Zett knights within a very short time. Memories of the old Z 900 and Z 1000 times were awakened by the "four-in-two-in-four exhaust system" with its four individual rear silencers, and the old tale of "Frankenstein’s daughter" was immediately back on the table. Since then, the “new” Z 1000 is not that new and with its smaller sister, formerly the Z 750 and now the Z 800, has become a mainstay of the Kawasaki model range. The modern Zetts have nothing more to do with Frankenstein or the wicked driving behavior of the first Z generation in 1976, but they have nothing to do with undisguised driving fun on the country road.

Your approach to these chapters is entirely different, however. The old Z 1000 combines an engine derived from the ZX-9R engine with a tame center and agile, powerful top end with a very soft chassis, while the modern Zett embeds a very high-torque and high-torque motor in a very stiff chassis . And that’s exactly how grandma and great-grandchildren drive themselves. The Ömchen has to be turned and spun, if things are to move quickly, the granddaughter shakes off intermediate sprints and overtaking maneuvers without shifting. The engines remained true to one another on one point. Neither the 2004 nor the 2014 engine are vibration-free. These vibrations seem to be part of the Z 1000 genetics like the four mufflers, the fat rear tire, the beefy overall package and the strikingly styled lamp mask.


PS

Progress in detail: 90 cubic centimeters more displacement and more advanced engine control electronics ensure the Goliath versus David situation shown here. Compared to the current version, the old Z 1000 acts like a throttled driving school moped in headwinds.

Off to the country road, a short family trip is on the agenda. Under normal traffic conditions, the grandma stays close on the heels of the grandson. Only on empty slopes like in the northern Black Forest does the old lady find herself increasingly short of breath. Her granddaughter, who has been very briefly translated and showing off her forcefully, stands up and away. Even increased switching work and permanent speeds of over 7000 turns only help to a limited extent to stay within striking distance. The chassis of the old Zett is far too soft, the brakes of our test bike too blunt. So the young Z has an easy job, hurrying confidently. Grandma only comes closer again on wrinkled asphalt and narrow country roads of the third order. Because the current Z 1000 is unnecessarily tightly tuned and then sometimes behaves so stubbornly that the pilot can no longer hear or see. Only the wide opening of the damping on the fork lets you calm down and makes the Z a popular companion even on bumpy slopes.

The fact that no one is perfect despite ten years of maturity can be seen in two other points on the current Z 1000. First: The gearbox of the new model (380 km on the clock) is very difficult to shift, here the 23,000 km old grandma scores. Second: The alignment of the handlebar fittings on the new one is crap. Either the levers are far too high and you can see something in the rear-view mirrors, or you can operate the levers (to do this you have to loosen the armature a little and turn it forwards) and see nothing in the mirrors. But apart from that, the Z 1000 has made real headway in ten years.

Data


fact

The applause was frenetic when in 2003 the "new" Kawasaki Z 1000 came onto the market.

Kawasaki Z 1000 (2004)

drive 

Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 93 kW (127 hp) at 10,000 rpm *,
96 Nm at 8000 rpm *, 953 cm³, bore / stroke: 77.2 / 50.9 mm,
Compression ratio: 11.2: 1, ignition / injection system, 38 mm throttle valves,
mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox,
G-Kat, chain
frame & 
Brakes

Tubular steel bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.0 degrees,
Trail: 101 mm, wheelbase: 1420 mm, upside-down fork,
Ø inner fork tube: 41 mm, adjustable in spring base and rebound.
Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base and rebound.
Front / rear suspension travel: 120/138 mm, cast light alloy wheels,
3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/50 ZR 17,
Michelin Pilot Power "E" test tires, 300 mm double disc brakes
with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with
Single-piston floating caliper at the rear
performance 
Max. Rear wheel power **  90.0 kW (122 PS) at 236 km / h
Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.1 s
0–150 km / h: 5.6 s
0-200 km / h: 9.9 s  
Draft **

50-100 km / h: 5.2 s
100-150 km / h: 5.4 s
Top speed * 245 km / h
measurements and weight

Length / width / height: 2040/760/1250 mm, seat / handlebar height: 805/995 mm
Handlebar width: 685 mm, 224 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 49.6 / 50.4%
consumption

Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 7.6 liters / 100 km,
Tank capacity: 18 liters, range: 237 km
Set up
Setup fork

stat. neg. spring travel: 35 mm, pressure level: -,
Rebound stage: completely closed, level: standard
Setup shock absorber

stat. neg.spring travel: 15 mm, pressure level: -,
Rebound stage: 1 U open, level: standard
Base price (2004) 9,990 euros (including additional costs)
All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement


fact

The Z cockpits have always been designed independently.

Kawasaki Z 1000 (2014)

drive 

Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 104 kW (142 hp)
at 10,000 rpm *, 111 Nm at 7300 rpm *, 1043 cm³, bore / stroke: 77.0 / 56.0 mm, compression ratio: 11.8: 1, ignition / injection system, 38 mm throttle valves,
mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain
frame & 
Brakes

Light alloy backbone frame, steering head angle: 65.5 degrees,
Trail: 101 mm, wheelbase: 1435 mm, upside-down fork,
Inner fork tube: 41 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression.
Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base and rebound.
Suspension travel front / rear: 120/122 mm, cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17,
Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/50 ZR 17, first tires: Dunlop D 214 "T",
310 mm double disc brake with radially attached four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 250 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

performance  Max. Rear wheel power **  95.5 kW (130 PS) at 207 km / h

Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.2 s
0–150 km / h: 5.6 s
0-200 km / h: 10.0 s      Draft **

50-100 km / h: 3.7 s
100-150 km / h: 3.7 s Top speed * 237 km / h measurements and weight

Length / width / height: 2060/900/1230 mm, seat / handlebar height: 800/995 mm,
Handlebar width: 710 mm, 222 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 50.2 / 49.8% consumption

Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 6.9 liters / 100 km, tank capacity: 17 liters, range: 246 km Set up Setup fork

stat. neg. travel: 24 mm,
Compression stage: completely open, rebound stage: 4.5 U open, level: standard Setup shock absorber

stat. neg.spring travel: 12 mm, pressure level: -,
Rebound: 4.25 U open, level: standard Base price (2014) 12,195 euros (plus additional costs) All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement

rating


fact

The Z 1000 has made real progress in ten years.


Max.
Points 
 
Kawasaki 
Z 1000
(2004)
Kawasaki
Z 1000
(2014)
drive
acceleration 10 7th 7th
Draft 10 5 9
Power delivery  10 6th 8th
Responsiveness 10 7th 7th
Load change reaction 10 6th 7th
Running culture 10 4th 6th
Gear actuation 10 7th 5
Gear ratio 10 7th 9
Clutch function 10 6th 6th
Traction control 10
Subtotal
100
55
64
landing gear
Driving stability 10 6th 7th
Handiness 10 7th 7th
Cornering stability 10 6th 8th
feedback 10 6th 8th
Suspension tuning in front  10 6th 8th
Chassis set-up at the rear  10 6th 7th
Braking effect 10 7th 9
Brake metering 10 7th 9
Erection moment
when braking
10

6th

5

ABS function 10 9
Subtotal
100
57
77
Everyday life and driving fun
Sitting position 10 7th 8th
Windbreak 10 2 1
Furnishing 10 3 5
consumption 10 5 6th
Driving fun 10 6th 8th
Subtotal
50
23
28
Total
250
135
168
placement

2.
1.

Ducati 999 S (2004) and Ducati 1199 Panigale S (2014)


fact

The rattling through the city with the Ducati 999 S is deep in the memory.

It was the first superbike that I got my hands on after starting at PS in 2004: the Ducati 999. Okay, in fact it was the hot R version back then, but when I got back into the saddle of a 999 after ten years swing , this feeling from then is immediately awake again. The hard seat pan, the stumps lying far in front and below, this ultra-slim tank with the mighty twin underneath elicit the same "wow" that made me roll from the courtyard with awe. The rattling through the city is also deeply remembered. But honestly, the current Ducati Panigale with the hacking short-stroke twin and this crazy hot exhaust air in the crotch is exponentially more annoying. In the first bends, the ten-year-old diva then demands recognition, because this engine from back then was a really great drive on country roads compared to today’s. It pulls through very smoothly from 3500 rpm, the smoothness is remarkable. Along the small Black Forest river on the well-developed and beautifully curved road, the 999 conveys that beautiful superbike feeling, where everything can but doesn’t have to be.

The 999 completely misses the latent aggressiveness of the Panigale. You may therefore perceive the 999 engine as a bit tough and, in direct comparison, accuse it of a lack of revving and a bit of stubbornness, but you can also stroll with it, a gear higher or lower does not matter to the 90 degree V – the Panigale can’t do that at all.

In addition, the gentle throttle response and the linear performance curve – top notch! The Panigale reveals a completely different character. Somehow it’s no longer the twin feeling that the 999 passed on to the 1090 almost without further ado. After the 999, the Testastretta already looked much more revving and speed-oriented, but what the current superbike is doing is simply the famous paradigm shift. Today, speed and top performance are everything, more four-cylinder than the typical twin feeling. This is probably why the Panigale believes it can afford this mighty performance drop between 5000 and 7000 rpm. Definitely on the racetrack, but I’ll stick with it on the country road, the 999 twin is still the more enjoyable engine today.


PS

Let’s leave out the topic of top performance, it has so much more value in racing. The 999 turns beautifully linearly through the speed range and delivers high-quality, finely controllable torque. The Panigale are lower speeds sausage, the only way to explain the trailer between 5000 and 7000 / min.

Their brakes are still up to date. The Brembo saddles from back then lacked the ultra-brutal bite of the current monoblocks, but the 999 also went deeply into the irons. The only disturbing thing was the cumbersome turn of the older diva. The raised Metzeler Sportec M5s are blamed. The fork was revised by HH-Racetec shortly before our test, which is why the beautiful response is definitely on Hubert Hoffmann’s cap, but on our handling test route the 999 revealed that there are ten heavy development years between it and the new superbike. How the Panigale turns, stays in lane, drives even tighter lines with light impulses and can be turned around in alternating curves is incredibly much better, especially in direct comparison with the ancestor, which requires more effort and yet never achieves such agility. In addition, the 999 lurches with its rear end before every bend when downshifting – of course, an anti-hopping clutch was unusual back then.

Both Öhlins chassis demand hardness from their drivers, and the rear section in particular seems terribly overdamped on both uneven country roads. The huge adjustment range of the electronic system of the Panigale S reduces this a little more than the conventional Öhlins shock absorber of the 999 (see setup in the data box), but in the high-speed range both look almost the same as a rigid frame.

We don’t need to say a lot about the electronic advantages of the Panigale: one has everything, the other nothing. In the end, the Panigale clearly prevails because a lot has happened in ten years. And if the sitting posture on the 999 was already compelling me to respect it, then the Panigale scores tremendously with it: active over the handlebars on the motorcycle towards deep and long – the development can be felt everywhere.
Uwe Seitz

Data


fact

The 999 completely misses the latent aggressiveness of the Panigale.

Ducati 999 S (2004)

drive 

Two-cylinder, 90-degree V engine, four valves / cylinder, 100 kW (136 hp) at 9750 rpm *,
106 Nm at 8000 rpm *, 998 cm³, bore / stroke: 100.0 / 63.5 mm,
Compression ratio: 11.4: 1, ignition / injection system, 54 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-plate dry clutch, six-speed gearbox, U-Kat, chain
frame & 
Brakes

Steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 65.5 / 66.5 degrees, caster: 97/91 mm,
Wheelbase: 1420 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm,
adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection,
adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 125/128 mm,
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 5.50 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17,
rear: 180/55 ZR 17, test tires: Michelin Pilot Power 3, 320 mm double disc brakes
with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 240 mm single disc with two-piston fixed calipers at the rear
performance 
Max. Rear wheel power **  92 kW (125 PS) at 270 km / h
Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.1 s
0-150 km / h: 5.3 s
0-200 km / h: 9.1 s
Draft **

50-100 km / h: 5.6 s
100–150 km / h: 5.6 s
Top speed * 271 km / h
measurements and weight

Length / width / height: 2030/780/1080 mm, seat / handlebar height: 810/830 mm,
Handlebar width: 660 mm, 213 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 49.4 / 50.6%
consumption

Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 6.8 liters / 100 km,
Tank capacity: 15.5 liters, range: 227 km
Set up
Setup fork

stat. neg. spring travel: 36 mm, pressure level: 6 K open,
Rebound stage: 16 K open, level: standard
Setup shock absorber

stat. neg. spring travel: 15 mm, pressure level: 14 K open,
Rebound stage: 20 K open, level: standard
Base price (2004) 20,995 euros (plus additional costs)
All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement


fact

The Panigale reveals a completely different character. Somehow it’s not that twin feeling anymore.

Ducati 1199 Panigale S (2014)

drive 

Two-cylinder 90-degree V engine, four valves / cylinder, 143 kW (192 hp) at 10,750 rpm *,
132 Nm at 9000 rpm *, 1198 cm³, bore / stroke: 112.0 / 60.8 mm,
Compression ratio: 12.5: 1, ignition / injection system, 67.5 mm throttle bodies,
hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox,
G-Kat, chain, traction control
frame & 
Brakes

Load-bearing motor with light metal subframe, steering head angle: 65.5 degrees, caster: 100 mm, wheelbase: 1437 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, electr. adjustable rebound and compression level. Single spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage (electr.). Spring travel front / rear: 120/130 mm, forged alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 200/55 ZR 17, first tires: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP, 330 mm Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers attached radially at the front, 245 mm single disc with two-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS
performance 
Max. Rear wheel power **  131 kW (178 PS) at 279 km / h

Acceleration**

0-100 km / h: 3.2 s
0–150 km / h: 5.0 s
0-200 km / h: 7.6 s
Draft **

50-100 km / h: 4.9 s
100–150 km / h: 4.9 s
Top speed * 296 km / h
measurements and weight

Length / width / height: 2060/810/1110 mm, seat / handlebar height: 820/850 mm,
Handlebar width: 670 mm, 195 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 52.5 / 47.5%
consumption

Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 7.4 liters / 100 km,
Tank capacity: 17 liters, range: 230 km
Set up
Setup fork

stat. neg.spring travel: 30 mm, pressure level: level 27 of 31,
Rebound: Level 25 of 31 (both almost completely open), Level: Standard
Setup shock absorber

stat. neg. spring travel: 14 mm, pressure level: completely open,
Rebound stage: level 12, level: standard, deflection: standard (F)
Base price (2004) 24,990 euros (plus additional costs)
All damping settings counted from completely closed; static negative spring deflection standing vertically
without driver; U = revolutions; K = clicks; * Manufacturer information; ** PS measurement

rating


fact

In the end, the Panigale clearly prevails because a lot has happened in ten years.


Max.
Points
 
Ducati 
999 p

Ducati
1199
Panigale S
drive
acceleration 10 8th 9
Draft 10 5 6th
Power delivery  10 7th 6th
Responsiveness 10 8th 8th
Load change reaction 10 8th 8th
Running culture 10 7th 7th
Gear actuation 10 6th 7th
Gear ratio 10 6th 8th
Clutch function 10 6th 6th
Traction control 10 9
Subtotal
100
61 74
landing gear
Driving stability 10 8th 8th
Handiness 10 6th 8th
Cornering stability 10 8th 9
feedback 10 8th 9
Suspension tuning in front  10 8th 8th
Chassis set-up at the rear  10 7th 7th
Braking effect 10 8th 10
Brake metering 10 8th 10
Erection moment
when braking
10

9 9
ABS function 10 10
Subtotal
100
70 88
Everyday life and driving fun
Sitting position 10 6th 7th
Windbreak 10 6th 6th
Furnishing 10 5 9
consumption 10 6th 5
Driving fun 10 8th 8th
Subtotal
50
31 35
Total
250
162 197
placement

2. 1.

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