Tests – Bluetooth kits test for bikers: which device to choose? – Technical characteristics Parrot SK4000

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17th Pictures

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Picture gallery: Impressions of small scramblers.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

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The Ducati wants high speeds, the Guzzi are very low.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.

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Desmo-V2, 399 cm3, a good 40 hp, 186 kilos: The little Ducati is as easy to ride as a bicycle, but the price is high at 7790 euros.

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The purely digital speedometer disrupts the cool look a little. The tachometer runs along the bottom and is difficult to read.

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On the Kayaba strut, only the spring base can be adjusted, the Showa telescopic fork cannot be adjusted at all. But the chassis is completely sufficient for the performance of the 400 series.

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Second course, open the gas until there is a lot of dust, and – wrooom – into the mud baths with taste.

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The narrower the path, the greater the fun with both scramblers.

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Motorbike Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

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Bumper V2 engine, 744 cm3, 48 hp, 202 kilos: the Guzzi including the scrambler kit is even more expensive than the Duc at 13,335 euros.

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Timelessly elegant and also very informative: the Guzzi cockpit with the two classic round instruments.

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The two red Bitubo struts look pretty good, but are expensive (around 750 euros) and do not significantly improve suspension and damping.

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Two scramblers from Italy, both with V2 engines and yet very different characters.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler in comparison test

Little scrambler

Driving away from everyday life and having a lot of fun at the same time – is that even possible with little things like the two Italian motorcycles Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler? Of course it works. However, you should choose the routes for a real pleasure ride with care.

First it splashes, then the mud splashes on all sides – the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 gets a decent fango pack than that M.oto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler plows through the puddle right next to her. The revenge follows only 20 meters further, because there is no lack of lush pools of water on the gravel path. Motorcycles and drivers are now properly sunk in, so it can go on: second gear, open the gas until there is a lot of dust, and – wrooom – into the mud baths with a taste. Carefree salmon volleys soar into the summer sky. In the specific case, “open completely” means a good 50 km / h. And it doesn’t matter at all if the tires briefly lose traction – the two motorcycles are so low and light that they can easily be caught again.

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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler in comparison test
Little scrambler

Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler; the latter is not a series machine, but the basic model Special is provided with a corresponding parts kit from the manufacturer. Despite their southern origin, neither of them see themselves as classy or hot-blooded.

Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 with just 399 cm³

The little Ducati is called Sixty2, but that doesn’t refer to its displacement, but to the year of birth of its ancestor, the hauntingly beautiful single-cylinder scrambler from the 1960s. In terms of displacement, the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 by no means achieves 620, but just 399 cm³ and delivers exactly 40.3 hp, as the measurement on the MOTORCYCLE test bench shows. The Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler does not conjure up a lot of power from its 744 cm³, but rather a moderate 48 hp.

Not really lavish, but that’s enough for entertaining driving pleasure, as the boisterous and species-appropriate off-road insert proves. After all, both motorcycles are scramblers, in German "Kraxler", whose ancestors were among the first European road enduros. The soft studded tires that both wear suggest also soft excursions on gravel paths.

Role models from the 1960s

The first trip was really fun, the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler adorn the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 and Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler. But where to next with the tame horses, beyond mud and dust? Better not to go on the autobahn, slipstream duels with small cars promise little driving pleasure. And besides: who wants to take a motorcycle on the highway anyway? Just. Then it is better to first take the developed federal highways quickly.

The idea turns out to be useful to experience the different characters of the two machines. Already visually, they differ greatly, even if they are both called Scramblers and are each driven by a traditional, air-cooled V2 engine. The Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 is modern and stylish and has a fresher look, only borrowing slightly retro from the in-house model from the 60s.

Big differences, despite the same name

The Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler, on the other hand, looks like the consistent continuation of a long line of ancestors with slightly updated resources. She doesn’t need retro styling – she embodies retro in its purest form. With classic charm, which you never tire of, your veteran bumper V2 pushes powerfully from idle, already at 3000 rpm it reaches its maximum torque of almost 60 Nm. If you want real, if somewhat braked, V2 thrust from the lower rev range, the V7 II Special is spot on, especially since it feels like a grown-up motorcycle.

The Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 is completely different. Although it weighs “only” 16 kilos less than the Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler, it looks significantly lighter and more delicate, almost like a bicycle, agile and nimble. Although nobody would call their little V2 engine nimble, at least not in this environment. Between the brisk avalanches of sheet metal on the main road, it only comes up to speed with difficulty, only at 8000 rpm does it create a moderate 33 Nm and thus maximum torque. There’s not much going on around the bottom, once again the popular saying that nothing can replace displacement – and the Ducati doesn’t have much of that.

Enjoyable gliding through shady river valleys

While the stockier Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler easily swims in the hurried traffic flow, on the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 you have your hands full to keep the connection to the front and at the same time to keep the cars jostling from behind off the mudguard. The sixth gear is apparently an overdrive, it feels like it takes half an eternity for the motorcycle to build up speed. It’s a little better in fifth gear, but not very dynamic either. Overtaking maneuvers at over 100 km / h? Better not, who knows how long it will take the little one to cheat her way past a fast-paced coach.

So back off the main road, on a discovery tour through the villages. And here, on the streets of the third or fourth order, the two machines find their destination. Wild meandering curves, gently rounded hills or simple cross-country passages – the sparse the traffic and the narrower the streets, the greater the pleasure in the saddle of the two scramblers. No stress, no pressure, just enjoyable gliding through shady river valleys, through dense forests with a resinous scent and past summery meadows with tall grasses. The chassis of both machines are completely sufficient for such decelerated routes. Both telescopic forks respond quite well on bumpy slopes, but when the pace accelerates, the shock absorbers offer little damping, and bumps can quickly break through. Therefore, it is better to reduce your speed and continue hiking happily.

Sixty2 should appeal to the hip young people

The joy of Freud is easier with the Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler than with the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2, because the different engine concepts are even more noticeable on narrow paths. While the Guzzi wags casually through bends at low speeds and swings across the streets, the Ducati constantly wants to be kept in a good mood – i.e. at around 6000 to 8000 rpm. In the long run, it cuts the best figure in the city, because there it scurries through the thickest of traffic jams in no time with its slim silhouette.

This is what Ducati mainly intended for: Especially in Italy and Spain, the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 should compete with the dreary city scooters among hip youngsters. Will the concept work? So far, Ducati has only sold just under 500 units in domestic Italy.

Own style and lots of exclusivity

Which maybe has to do with the price. As attractive as the two little scramblers may be – they are very expensive. The Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 costs 7.790 euros, the Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler even costs 13.335 euros. However, it does contain add-on parts that you can do without, such as the Bitubo struts. If you have discovered your heart for the Guzzi Scrambler, you should watch the price development, because all V7 II are still homologated according to Euro 3 and therefore discontinued models in 2017, which suggests cheap sales. Alternatively, there is the V7 II Stornello for 10,300 euros, a similarly structured series scrambler and soon to be discontinued. And the 400cc Ducati? Would definitely be a recommendation for beginners, but the price difference to the sister model with 800 cm³ and 75 hp is small, because it is available for 1000 euros more.

At least one can comfort oneself over the high prices with the fact that the neighbor will definitely not arrive on the same motorcycle. Because despite all the differences, Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler and Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 have two things in common: their very own style and a lot of exclusivity.

Technical data Ducati Scrambler Sixty2


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Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.

Data Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler


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Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler.

MOTORCYCLE conclusion


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The Ducati wants high speeds, the Guzzi are very low.

Two scramblers from Italy, both with V2 engines and yet very different characters. The Ducati Scrambler Sixty2 is particularly suitable for real beginners, it feels light, is agile and never overwhelmed. However, nothing is going on in the speed range of the 400, it wants to be kept at at least 6000 rpm, and its 41 hp are mainly good for the city and small streets. The Moto Guzzi V7 II Scrambler looks a lot more grown-up in comparison, with 48 hp it swims easily even in fast traffic, especially since the 750 engine offers pressure from below. However, their strengths are also more on narrow country roads. Both like to take mud baths as real scramblers.

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